Category Archives: ivory coast

The mola

 

Cesarean section in Ivory Coast, 2012

At around 10 am the midwife came to the Operating theatre where we had just started todays list after completing the morning patient rounds: Mostly minor cases, incision of abscesses, dressing changes. Now, a 19-year old pregnant woman had presented with continuous heavy vaginal bleeding. According to the midwife there was no fetal heart activity. According to the woman, she was in week 33. We did not have access to ultrasound. She needed a Cesarean section. With no obstetrician employed, this is the job of the surgeon.

10 minutes later the woman was in the operating theatre and we prepared for the Cesarean section. Probably a placenta previa I thought.  I opened the uterus and I still remember the subsequent moments of  confusion and disbelief when I removed handful after handful of what looked like small white eggs. There was no child inside. Instead this was a molar pregnancy, which the woman had carried undetected into the 33rd week  due to the lack of access to pre-natal counseling in the remote are where she lived. I removed the mola and closed the uterus. She was 19. She would be able to have more children.

However, the postoperative course was complicated, she kept bleeding. Was this perhaps an invasive mola?  We will never know exactly. I had to perform an emergency hysterectomy, but the vaginal bleeding persisted, however by now it was slowly diminishing. Was there perhaps also an element of coagulopathy? Possibly, but without adequate testing modalities, no way to know for certain and in any case no treatment would be available. After a few more days on the ward she was ready for discharge.

How does the future look, in this relatively remote part of the country, for a 19-year old woman, just married and  not able to have kids?

Not necessarily bad, I was told. In many such cases a childless couple would raise the children of other family members, such as her sister, as their own.

Obviously with access to appropriate prenatal care, the condition would have been detected far earlier and probably could have been treated.

Douekoué, Ivory Coast, 2012.

The boy with the bladder stone

I was standing in the courtyard outside the surgical ward, when a man approached me with his 14-year old son. Are you the surgeon, he asked? Then he went on to tell me how his son had suffered from recurrent urinary tract infections the past 4 years, resistant to the available antibiotics. They finally saved enough money to have an ultrasound examination that showed a 3*3 cm stone in the bladder. They came from a city 6 hours away by bus, and they had visited 5 hospitals already asking for advice, and everywhere they were met with the same answer: “No, this we cannot do. We do not do specialized surgery here.”

Hospital Duekoue Ivory Coast
Sterilized surgical equipment, Ivory Coast

In fact, the operation itself: A small incision, open the bladder, remove the stone and close again is relatively simple and takes no more than 15 minutes, however bladder stones are not common in the Ivory Coast and none of the general practitioners (with surgical competences) or surgeons had done it before. As recurrent UVIs may well harm the kidney on the longterm, there is good indication to remove the stone. I did not have access to ultrasound but I trusted the father´s description and scheduled the boy for surgery the next day where I removed the bladder stone uneventfully and inserted a normal Foley catheter. The only adverse event came after 7 days where it was entirely impossible to remove the Foley catheter as we could not empty the balloon, thus I had to open the bladder and puncture the balloon, remove the catheter, replace it with another Foley, wait another 7 days, after which this catheter was finally removed and the boy discharged. The last thing I remember was his father hiring a photographer for the money he did not have to take a picture of me together with his son as he was convinced that ”God and I had saved his life”:

Bladder stone Ivory Coast

March 2012, Duekoue, MSF supported hospital, Ivory Coast.

All stories and photograph with permission of the involved patients.